Letter to the Editor: Briana Mathews

Two Fridays ago, I picked up the Scout’s Valentine’s Day issue. Immediately, I felt it was inappropriate and very tasteless material. Although it did not offend me personally, I understood how the paper was offensive as it was heteronomative, slut shaming, and promoting a rape culture. I applaud the students that United together to start a campaign, the Alumni and faculty that wrote letters to the editor displaying their disgust and disapproval. I have never seen so many BU students show such passion and urgency about a cause — let alone a cause involving oppression. The Scout taught more than just how to have an orgy. It revealed to many for the first time that everything that is supposed to be funny can be offensive and offensive ain’t funny.

While majority of BU are just now facing this fact, Black Latino and Asian Americans on this campus tried to preach this same lesson not too long ago before and after the satire comedy show, NWC, was brought to this campus. We expressed our concerns about how the show could be hurtful and were ignored. We were told that sometimes humor is the best way to raise awareness about uncomfortable topics. I guess they only mean race. Even after the show we had to try to convince them that the show was executed poorly, misrepresented students of color and made us feel even more isolated. Yet the same organizations that ignited this United stand against the Scout, did not understand the hurt that minorities felt. How sway? I mean they brought a show that was titled a comedy to tackle stereotypes that has caused NUMEROUS UNARMED African Americans death without prosecution. Not to mention how the show wrongfully translated that all minorities wanted to be white at some point in time and the best thing blacks achieved was inventing the traffic light.

So while I applaud the actions of the BU community for standing for a justice. I am beyond frustrated that soooo many got the point and even did what they could to get minority organizations in Alliance, but when it pertained to race there was silence and confusion.

Now take this parallel between the raunchy Scout articles that was an optional reading to a required comedic race show and raise your own conclusion. You can claim I’m throwing the race card and being that angry black girl. Indeed, I smacked my lips, did some neck rolls, a lot of hand gestures while writing this. But be clear, I am apart of 2 organizations signed on to say that the articles were offensive because I GET IT. I am NOT belittling anything. You can call it what you want but I’m gone call it like it is: the Scout showed that people only stopped laughing when the joke was on them.
Hopefully, we can get to the point where it doesn’t have to offend you personally, for you to stand up!

– Briana Mathews
Psychology major, Criminal Justice minor ’17
Bmathews@mail.bradley.edu