Beyonce a favorite for NAACP’s I AM VIDEO performers

Bradley’s chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People held the second annual I Am Video competition Friday evening in the Student Center Ballroom. The contest concluded the chapter’s anniversary week of activities.

Originally the I Am Video concept was hosted by faculty advisors of the Garrett Center. This year the Garrett Center gave the concept to NAACP for their week of activities.

The contest is an opportunity for an individual or a group of people to win prizes by performing their favorite music videos. This year, the first place winner won a cash prize of $250 and the second place winners won $100.

The winner of the contest, sophomore biomedical engineering major Chloe Rose Jackson, performed to Beyonce.

“It feels really great,” she said. “I was so nervous, but I did what I had to do and I had fun at the same time.”

While preparing for the contest, Jackson said she studied Beyonce’s music video, “Ego” 50 or more times to get the choreography perfect. Second place winners Alexandria Jackson, Chaunice Allen, Bintu Nije, Ashley Tobias and Shardonnay Hawthorne, performed Beyonce’s “Love on Top.”

Since the event was successful last year, NAACP president Latifa Body said she wanted to keep the overall concept the same, but decided to change the prizes.

“We changed the prizes to make it fair for all the contestants,” she said. “Last year, the grand prize was $500 and the winner took all.”

This year the contestants danced to music videos by Chris Brown and Beyonce.

“[The videos were judged on] likeness to video, attire, coordination and choreography,” said Amanda Wallace, Vice President of NAACP.

Paige Dowell-Celestin, a visiting sibling for the weekend, said she was impressed by the contestants and hosts.

“It was really fun to watch,” she said. “The [contestants] kept it nice and short. I like how the hosts kept the audience involved.”

Body said she was happy with the turnout for the event and is looking forward to having it again next year.

“I want it to be bigger and better than this year,” she said. “And I would like to see more people participate and a more diverse music selection from the contestants.”

Wallace said she hopes that those who saw the competition this year will audition next year.

“When people see that it’s fun, then more people will want to get involved,” she said.

Body and Wallace said they both were pleased with their chapter’s anniversary week of events.

“We got the NAACP’s name out there as an organization,” Wallace said. “I was very pleased with how the week turned out.”