Bradley accounting student writes self-improvement book

Commitment, truth and relationships are intimidating for most, but Jesse Reynolds is not running in the other direction.

He expresses many of his ideas in his new book “The Truth Behind a Lie: The Road to Commitment,” published this past spring.

Reynolds, a senior accounting major, said he has been writing since he was in the third grade.

“I’ve always been a writer,” he said. “I switched from a private school to a public school and felt like I was ahead of the other students. I began writing poetry to give myself something to do.”

With a story that digs deep into issues such as commitment in school, work and relationships, Reynolds said he wrote his book as a self-help book.

“The book is a self improvement book in the form of a narrative to help readers relate it back to their life,” he said.

There’s one important thing he said wants for people to understand.

“The main focus of the book is finding what’s important in your life,” Reynolds said. “Family, spirituality and soul. Commitment isn’t just a deal. It’s a road. It’s a journey.”

He said the book was helpful to him as he wrote and edited it because writing the book brought about a transformation in his own life.

“You learn something new each time you read it and continue to grow,” he said.

He originally found inspiration and ideas for his book through an online survey based on what people would want to read about, he said. Once he had his topic down, he said one page turned into 130 pages.

Although he has plans for five more books, his next book, which is still in the works, will be titled “The Unseen Conflict.” Based on the Bemba tribe in Africa, it will tell the story of a boy’s journey to become a man.

Reynolds said learning more about African culture has always been an interest to him.

“I hope I can give people a perspective on what other people live with every day,” he said. “My particular interest is in the family life of those in the tribe.”

Reynolds said he plans to join Teach for America after graduation.

“I would like to teach middle school mathematics because I think it’s a core area of education,” he said.

Reynolds said he has had many people tell him he is too young to write about such mature topics because he is only 22 years old.

“It’s not about your age, it’s about the experiences you have,” he said.

Reynolds will be holding a book signing on campus from 2-  4 p.m. on Sept. 17 at the Garrett Cultural Center.