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Candidates set to run for next year’s student body officers

The school year is coming to a close, which means Student Senate student body officer elections for next year are about to reach full bloom.
Chairman for senate’s elections subcommittee, freshman Wade Hatler, recently announced the slate for 2010’s student body elections.
“I am pleasantly pleased with the amount of students who are running for student body positions,” he said.
Student Body President Kyle Malinowski is not seeking re-election, and Technology Services and Affairs Chairperson Nicholas Switkowski (Blue ticket) is the only person campaigning for his position.
“The biggest challenge will be getting people to the polls since there is only one presidential candidate,” Malinowski said. “The responsibility to convince people to vote will be on Nick and the other candidates.”
Running for vice president are current Vice President Tricia Anklan (Red ticket), the current Academic Affairs Chairwoman Amanda Wenger (Blue ticket) and Mike Konieczny (Green ticket) who was a St. James senator last semester.
SAC and Singles senator Sarah Reyfield (Blue ticket) stands alone on the ballot for secretary.
Jenny Nguyen, the current senator for Panhellenic Council and Andrew Kerr, current Foster College of Business and Administration senator, are both running for Treasurer.
New names are not the only things to appear on this year’s ballot, a request for a new student mascot will be there as well. After receiving 833 signatures of approval, the ballot will also feature a recently debated statement.
The ballot will read: “President Glasser and her cabinet should take immediate action on developing an appropriate Bradley University mascot.” While voting, students will be able to check “yes” or “no” in response to the statement.
This question is being implemented on the ballot because of Glasser and her cabinet’s decision not to address the issue of a mascot.
Malinowski said the addition of the question is not to vote on a mascot, but to merely push the administration to take action.
“We want to use this ballot to make sure the issue of a mascot stays fresh,” he said. “Not only in the students’ minds, but in the administration’s minds.
Malinowski said placing this question on the ballot enables senate to “check the pulse” of the student body and see what students really think about the issue.
Student support of a new mascot will make it harder for the administration to ignore the mascot issue, he said.
“I guarantee you this issue will be revisited again after this year,” Malinowski said. “This is a constant problem that will plague this university until the problem is solved.”