Senate uncertain whether mascot referendum will cause response

Last week’s polls proved students are in favor of adding a mascot, as they overwhelmingly voted for the mast referendum.
A tangible mascot would give students something to rally behind, Student Body President Nicholas Swiatkowski said.
“It’s cooler to see an actual image than just the words, so I think that’s what students want to see happen,” he said. “It would boost morale and give them something to identify with.”
Swiatkowski said he hopes the administration will revisit the idea of a mascot and set up a committee.
“We haven’t heard anything back yet,” he said. “It’s still under review whether or not we get to keep the name Braves, so that’s a good starting point. It’s hard to say because we really haven’t heard anything one way or another.”
Former student body president Kyle Malinowski said students need to know where the mascot decision stands.
“I’d like to see two things happen with the administration,” he said. “First, I’d like them to actually discuss it, and second, I’d like them to have concrete plans and a timeline so students aren’t left in the dark. How the student body can get involved will play into the decision.”
Malinowski said he agreed a mascot would give students something to identify with.
“I think students recognize the power a mascot can have,” he said. “It would be a unifying force for something that encompasses everyone. Not just greeks or athletics, but all of us.”
Vice President for Student Affairs Alan Galsky said University President Joanne Glasser’s cabinet has the results in hand to begin a planning process.
“Our initial step is to sit down and discuss the referendum with the cabinet,” he said. “We’re in the process of developing a response that I will pass on to the student body officers and my student adviser committee, and that information will be sent to the student body. We want to get information out as soon as possible.”
Swiatkowski said finding a mascot is something students are passionate about. 
“This is something a lot of students want to see happen, and I plan to continue to voice that concern to the administration on behalf of the student body,” he said. “I think we did take it to the full extent that we could. We had a referendum on the ballot for students to vote on. We have a resolution, so we’ll see how they respond to it.”
The issue made headlines last week when the Journal Star and Associated Press reported the story.