Student Body Vice President Barred From Open Senate Meeting

A Student Senate Committee chairperson possibly violated the constitution Sunday night during the weekly Internal Affairs committee
meeting.
Upon arrival to the IA meeting,
Student Body Vice President Tricia Anklan was asked to leave by Internal Affairs Chairperson Emily Berger and told she was not allowed at the meeting, said St. James Senator Kyle Malinowski.
Senate’s constitution does not allow for closed committee meetings
to Senate members or the student body at large.
“I was shocked,” said Student Body Treasurer Andrew Kerr. “I think a definite line was crossed to hold a closed Senate meeting. Excluding members is unacceptable,
the way the constitution is written anyone can attend.”
As stated in Article IV of the constitution, “All Student Senate committees shall consist of those Student Senators and any Bradley University students interested in the goals established for each committee.”
Kerr said the meeting consisted of six students, the IA committee as well as himself and Student Body President Nick Swiatkowski, both who are not members of the IA committee.
Swiatkowski said he did not know what the cause of asking Anklan to leave the meeting was.
“I wasn’t too sure what to think,” said Swiatkowski. “It all happened so fast.”
Once Anklan was asked to leave, all of the students present excluding Swiatkowski and Berger left the room, Malinowski said.
“The main reason I asked her to leave was definitely in the heat of the moment,” Berger said. “ I have responsibility of the room and I was shocked that someone without
authority was let in.”
Malinowksi said Anklan had every right to be there and he was frustrated with the situation.
“There are some major issues with transparency on Senate,” said Malinowski. “The student body will lose faith in us and that is not something I or the Student Senate wants to see happen.”
Malinowski said the original IA meeting was announced to take place at 9 p.m. in the Student Senate office, but members received a phone call around 5 p.m. moving the meeting to the Caterpillar Global Communication Center.
When Anklan was notified late of the meeting location change, a university police officer let her into the building and escorted her into the classroom. Anklan said when she entered the room she was asked to leave immediately.
“It went too far and it’s unfortunate
that it happened,” Kerr said. “It makes me nervous that if I don’t agree with something on Senate, I won’t be invited to meetings