College family found in Scout newsroom

Everybody wants to find a place where they can fit in and belong. In college, it’s the fraternities or sororities, the floors in all of the dorms, student organizations or in my case – the Scout.

How can you describe a place that seemed like a zoo when I first started writing at the Scout two years ago, and like a family now?

Looking back, I have no idea how it happened. As this year progressed, the memories become less and less about the stories I have written and more about the fun trips to Chicago and St. Louis, the bars or just sitting in the office every Wednesday.

And I’m guessing that’s how most people are going to look back on their college experience. As all of the seniors fret about what’s next to come after graduation, it’s hard to look back and understand what’s happened to all of us since we graduated high school.

I remember stepping foot at Bradley for the first time during orientation the summer of 2009, and I didn’t know a soul. One of the last places I wanted to be was writing in a dying industry. Now I can’t imagine not choosing this school and the people who were a part of it.

From heading the College Democrats (and the six people that would show up to meetings) to working with the Peoria Chiefs, Rivermen and the athletic department, I can’t imagine doing anything different.

By graduating, it’s not the end of the best years of our lives. But it’s the end of the camaraderie that you feel by being around so many people who are in similar walks of life as yourself.

I’ll miss seeing the Scout sports editor, Alex Ross, who somehow put up with my antics for the past two years by seeing him each Wednesday, at numerous sporting events and sharing hotel rooms.

I’ll miss hearing those at the Voice talk about whatever movies they saw or music they listened to, and not understanding one word they said.

I’ll miss making fun of the top news editors at the Scout and how much harder they have to work on the paper than a simple sports section.

But most of all, I’ll miss the sense of belonging that this paper brought. It was a fun ride and while I doubt riding into the sunset is in my future, I’m glad to have been a part of this family.

I’ve had a lot of great times with this newspaper and in the words of the infamous poet, Jay-Z, “I’d rather die enormous than live dormant.”

 

Bobby is the assitant sports editor. He is a senior sports communications major from Bloomington, MN. Direct questions or comments to bnightengale@mail.bradley.edu