Editorial

A few weeks ago, a student witnessed pamphlets being distributed by the Moss-Bradley Residential Association. The pamphlet described the behaviors expected of residents living in the neighborhood.
The pamphlet didn’t specify that it was meant for students only, but the conduct deemed appropriate by the MBRA is clearly directed at students and meant to discourage normal college activity.
The MBRA addresses expected conduct for parties, stating neighbors will assume students are drinking underage if they are drinking out of red cups or out of a keg. 
But how can anyone know for sure what’s in a red cup? And not always does a keg indicate underage drinking.
We may be students but we’re not dumb.
We know our rights, and we know we’re innocent until proven guilty. 
But the really worrisome and even frightening part of the pamphlet is the fact that the MBRA threatens the use of video surveillance – even when it’s concealed.
This is where the MBRA crosses the line. Fear mongering is ridiculous and inappropriate. Residents are obviously trying to scare students, but where will that get anyone?
And when residents do observe students violating laws or rules, neighbors will report their behavior to the Peoria Police Department.
Calling the PPD seems to be the only solution the MBRA will resort to. The pamphlet states, “We do not believe that residents should have to ask you personally to obey our laws and ordinances.”
If they’re going to say they are neighbors, why aren’t they acting very neighborly?
The pamphlet welcomes all residents to the neighborhood, but when neighbors call the cops every time we honk our car horns or play sports in the street, as the pamphlet states they will, we aren’t going to feel very welcome.
The MBRA is only promoting the “us versus them” mentality, and that only makes students want to be uncooperative and hostile.
Residents should stop fighting fire with fire.
We don’t deny noise can be a problem in an off-campus area. But calling the police should be a last resort. Even though we are not year-long residents, we still deserve respect. And we’re capable of having civil, mature conversations.
Bradley released its own pamphlet to students living off campus about a week after the MBRA’s pamphlet was released. The two pamphlets have no connection to each other, and Bradley’s guidelines are more reasonable and fair.
The university suggests students talk to neighbors and communicate openly before issues arise.
But the MBRA does not want anything to do with students. Residents assume the worst of us, which isn’t going to achieve anything.
Calling the PPD is a waste of resources, time and money and pulls officers away from more important and pressing issues and problems.
We realize it could be difficult to live with the noise college students sometimes produce. And it’s difficult to live in a neighborhood where constant tension exists.
But here’s something the MBRA should learn to live with – we’re not going anywhere.