THE EARBUG: The Lumineers

If you’ve never gotten into folk rock, autumn is probably the best time to start. There is something about the changing of the leaves and the smell of bonfires in the crisp air that just begs for warm guitars and crooning violins. Before you scoff at the idea of listening to something that isn’t LMFAO or Justin Bieber, just give it a chance. I’m not asking you to go out and buy Bob Dylan’s full album anthology, just listen to a few songs. Preferably while driving with the windows down past some great scenery.

With that said, The Lumineers are one of my new favorite bands for the season. The Denver-based trio embodies the new spirit of folk rock, taking the best-loved elements of the genre and presenting a clean, decisively modern take on a classic. Think Bob Dylan, with less harmonicas.

The Lumineers have been around since 2005, but their debut album was just released in April. The self-titled record features heartfelt tracks with well-spun melodies that embody the somewhat country nature of folk music.

It is a solid effort from a band trying to do something new with something old. Certain tracks undoubtedly stand out more than others, but every track carries the story forward.
The story of what, exactly? Well that is what is so great about The Lumineers. They don’t claim to hold some secret to life: their story is everyone’s story. It is going home for the first time and remembering every twist and turn of your neighborhood. It is having the worst day of your life, and then ending it surrounded by the people who love you, pushing you on to the better next day.
On his band’s style, percussionist Jeremiah Fraites explains that this simple, transient Americana feeling is exactly the point.

“We’re not reinventing the wheel or doing anything that different, the songs are super simple,” Fraites said. “The ideas themselves are very simple ideas. Anyone who can play an instrument can play a Lumineers song. I think there’s a certain cinematic aspect of our music that I really like.”

Considering the amount of not so simple political rhetoric and ‘this is the real America’ we’re all going to hear for the rest of the month,  I’m sure the simplicity and roots rock style of The Lumineers will be a welcome change.

Drive to: Flowers in her hair

Study to: Ho hey

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