Ask the Doctor…

Occasionally my boyfriend and I have sex without a condom. Is pre-ejaculate something I should be worried about?

Yes, it is definitely something that needs to be worried about.  Men secrete a small amount of fluid prior to their climax. This fluid does contain sperm, even though it is a smaller concentration, and is capable of transmitting diseases such as gonorrhea and chlamydia. This is why the pull-out method is not a very effective method for birth control.

Condoms should be worn all the time, every time. They are one of the most effective forms of birth control and they are the only protection available against sexually transmitted diseases. Condoms do have expiration dates and should not be used past these as it increases the risk of breakage. They should also be kept in a safe place where you are sure they have not been tampered with.

Condoms are now available for free on campus.  Please contact the Wellness office if you need further information on this program.

 

If you don’t urinate after having sex, can you really get a urinary tract infection?

The short answer is yes. Women in general are more likely to get urinary tract infections because their urethra is shorter, meaning there is less distance from the bladder to the outside world.

Women who are sexually active are at an even higher risk for UTIs. The opening to the urethra and the opening to the vagina are in very close proximity to each other. Sex can be a messy business, and the possibility exists that bacteria could be pushed up the urethra during the act of intercourse.

The theory behind urinating after sex is this flushes the urethra and pushes the bacteria back outside the body before it has a chance to take hold and create an infection. This does not mean that you have to urinate after sex to prevent an infection but it is a good precaution to take, and if you are someone who is prone to UTIs, it is strongly encouraged.