Outside firm seeks student input for library updates

Bradley students’ prayers may be answered in the near future as plans to redesign Cullom-Davis Library are currently in the preliminary stages.

Canon Designs, the firm working on the library project, sought student input on Oct. 17 by conducting a survey where students ranked what they thought most needed renovation.

Students were given stickers labeled one through four and asked to place their stickers on a poster board that displayed prominent concerns. Categories of issues included new furniture, more outlets and more study spaces, among others.

The results of the survey are not yet available, said Executive Director of Cullom-Davis Library Barbara Galik. However, they will be key in determining the priorities for improving the library.

Students said one of the main complaints is the installation of security gates last semester at the front doors of the library.

“The gates are annoying,” said freshman engineering major John Goodrich. “They are such a nuisance to go through, especially if you forget your ID. But I doubt they’ll change that.”

Freshman nursing major Brandie Gelwicks also said the gates are the first issue the library needs to resolve.

“The sensors are stupid and very annoying,” she said. “They go off when people are trying to study, and it takes more time to [get into the library].”

Some students said the gates serve no purpose in the library.

“The sensors are pointless,” said sophomore biology major Veronica Cline. “Anybody could still climb over the gates and get in if they really wanted to. It’s a waste of money, plus you have to remember to bring your ID.”

Another issue students said the library needs to take into consideration is private rooms.

“There should be more study and quiet areas,” said junior civil engineering major Ross Hanchett. “I always have to search for [quiet spaces], and then people take it over and it’s loud.”

Freshman civil engineering major David Green said he agreed.

“I wish people wouldn’t talk or play with their phones in the basement,” he said. “I know they put signs up to quiet people, but I don’t really know how they could change that.”

Other primary complaints from students include installing more outlets, free printing and updating the computer labs.

“The computer labs have a lot of issues,” said junior criminal justice and sociology major Blanca Alvarez. “They either freeze or you have to move to another computer. They need to be fixed or replaced.”

Galik said students’ issues will be considered into the planning process.

“The end result will be a plan to redesign the library with a more effective and efficient use of space and furniture more suited to the needs of students today,” said Galik.  “The plan will be

phased in over multiple years.”

Canon Designs is meeting with university committees and other stakeholders to round out the plan for the library.