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Haack’s accolade not enough against Minnesota

Gabi Haack shoots a three-pointer. Photo courtesy of Josh Schwam/Bradley Athletics

Gabi Haack just keeps breaking records.

Last Friday, the senior guard became the only active player in women’s college basketball to record 300 3-pointers, 300 free throws and 700 rebounds for her career in a 54-73 loss at Minnesota. This came four days after breaking the MVC record for career 3-pointers and a week after becoming Bradley’s all-time leading scorer.

The moment came on the first possession of the game as Haack drained a three, the 300th of her career – joining Kyle Korver and Shane Hawkins as the only basketball student-athletes in Missouri Valley Conference history to drain 300 career treys.

“It’s pretty special,” Haack said of her accolades. “I’m really thankful for all the people who have invested in me and helped me get to where I am today.”

This record was especially meaningful as it occurred in her home state of Minnesota, on the same court where she won Elk River High School’s only state championship.

“It was really special to be able to go back to my home state,” Haack said. “That gym has a little special place in my heart, so it was really fun to be back there and to be able to play in front of some of my Minnesota fans.”

However, Haack’s first-possession shot perhaps felt like the only one the Braves made the entire game, as they put up an abysmal 28% from 3-point land and 31% from the field. For head coach Andrea Gorski, this was the obvious cause of their downfall.

“We shot poorly,” Gorski said. “You’re not gonna really have a good chance to win when you’re shooting that percentage.”

Bradley started off strong, only trailing by one at the end of the first quarter while shooting 57% from three. Led by eight of Haack’s 19 points, the Braves went back and forth with the Gophers with three ties and seven lead changes throughout the frame. 

Once the second quarter hit, the Gophers ramped things up, shooting 61% from the field and closing the first half on a 17-3 run to take a 42-27 lead going into the break. Their lead never dipped below 15 for the rest of the game. 

“They got a really big run and we just never came back from that,” Haack said. “Just that gap and that scoring that Minnesota had in that second quarter was just too big for us.”

Bradley also got a season-best 12 points from senior Tatum Koenig and nine points, four rebounds and three blocks from Minneapolis native Sierra Morrow in the junior’s return home. 

“I really thought we took a big step forward against Minnesota,” Gorski said. “I thought that was probably our best overall game, other than shooting.”

After starting the season with three straight wins, the Braves have now dropped two in a row and Gorski believes the defense is what will put them back on the right track.

“We have to get more stops, cause more turnovers, get in the passing lanes a bit more,” Gorski said. “I thought we got pretty decent looks against Minnesota and they just didn’t go, so I don’t think the offense and what we were doing there was an issue.”

Bradley took down Big 10 member Wisconsin on Nov. 19, bringing its record to 1-1 against the conference this season. Despite the challenge they pose, Gorski thinks these high-level games will help prepare her squad for the future.

“This is our most challenging non-conference schedule I’ve ever had here,” Gorski said. “Our conference is tough, so we wanted to know all of our weaknesses before we hit the Valley.” 

The Braves will look to bounce back against North Dakota State tomorrow at 7 p.m. in the first of four straight road games.

2 Comments

  1. Linda Robson Linda Robson December 3, 2021

    Gorski says all the right things but that doesn’t win games. Performance wins games. Great column. Hope you have a Happy Birthday!

  2. Fred Fred December 14, 2021

    Well done, Gabi! Keep it up.

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